SEAS in the News

2/15/18
An article in Business First features research by Kwang Oh, professor of electrical engineering and biomedical engineering, who is developing technology that will allow researchers to create a “lab on a chip” that will allow medical personnel to use a cell phone or similar handheld device to draw a patient’s blood and provide in-depth medical information on the spot.
2/15/18
An article on the website of the National Science Foundation reports on research by Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor of electrical engineering, that suggests electronic devices could be powered by a small metallic tab that would generate electricity through bending a finger or other simple movements.
2/14/18
An article in Business First reports three UB startups – Ferrick Contrast, Neurovascular Diagnostics and Sunny Clean Water – have each received six-figure awards from the National Science Foundation to boost their early-stage technologies.
2/14/18
An article on AZoNano reports on UB research that suggests electronic devices could be powered by a small metallic tab that would generate electricity through bending a finger or other simple movements, and quotes Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor of electrical engineering.
2/13/18
An article on New Atlas , an online technology publication with a circulation of more than 5 million readers per month, reports on UB research that suggests electronic devices could be powered by a small metallic tab that would generate electricity through bending a finger or other simple movements, and quotes Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor of electrical engineering.
2/12/18
An article in England’s Mirror reports on UB research that suggests electronic devices could be powered by a small metallic tab that would generate electricity through bending a finger or other simple movements, and quotes Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor of electrical engineering.