Aich honored for contributions to sustainable nanotechnology research

By Peter Murphy

Published November 15, 2019

Nirupam Aich, an assistant professor of environmental engineering, received the 2019 Emerging Investigator Award from the Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization (SNO).

Making impacts in Sustainabale Nanotechnology

“Some of my work is to demonstrate the need for in-depth research on the health and safety of an emerging set of conjugated nanomaterials or nanohybrids, this has created a new and important direction in the sustainable nanotechnology community.”
Nirupam Aich, Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering
Nirupam Aich accepts award at SNO conference.

Aich (left) accepts Emerging Investigator Award at 2019 SNO Conference

The SNO recognizes one scientist or engineering each year who has “an impactful body of independent work and publications in the area of sustainable nanotechnology: environmental, society or economic,” according to the organization.

Aich’s research group, Aich Laboratory for Environmental Nanotechnology and Sustainability (#AichLENS), focuses on the design and application of smart and advanced multifunctional nanomaterials and nano-enabled technologies for water and wastewater management, however, in conjunction with efforts to maintain the environmental and public health impact of novel nanomaterials to a minimum.

Since 2012, Aich has published over 25 peer-reviewed articles in high impact journals, 7 book chapters, 6 conference papers and 1 patent for his research on the sustainable use of nanomaterials for water treatment and sustainable infrastructure.

“Some of my work is to demonstrate the need for in-depth research on the health and safety of an emerging set of conjugated nanomaterials or nanohybrids,” Aich says, “This has created a new and important direction in the sustainable nanotechnology community.”

Aich received the award at the 2019 SNO conference from November 7 – 9 in San Diego, California. Aich was an invited speaker at the conference, and gave a plenary talk on his research and how it relates to opportunities in sustainable nanotechnology for water treatment.

“In the coming decade, there are opportunities through the use of safer-by-design, additive manufacturing or 3D printing, and data science approaches,” Aich says, “We have been developing these forward-looking research areas in the sustainable nanotechnology field.”

The SNO Emerging Investigator Award is given out to one engineer or scientist who has received their PhD within the last 10 years and who is working in the area of sustainable nanotechnology. Recipients of this award have already made significant contributions to the sustainable nanotechnology field through an impactful body of independent work, publications and teaching, service and leadership.

Aich joined UB in 2016. His current research projects include Synthesis and characterization of magnetic graphene oxide-nano zero valent iron (GO-nZVI) nanohybrids using biocompatible cross-linkers for contaminant removal.