June 7-8, 2022 | 110 Knox Hall, UB North Campus | Buffalo, NY

About the Symposium

This annual symposium is dedicated to the late Erich Bloch, former director of the National Science Foundation who helped endow the Department of Materials Design and Innovation at UB. The symposium is part of the MDI Summer Institute, an extra-mural program of UB’s Department of Materials Design and Innovation that supports a broad range of outreach activities to promote research and education platforms in materials design. This year's conference theme is connectomics.

Connectomics – Seeking connections across diverse data and information

The concept of ‘connectomics’ is used in the field of neuroscience to address the challenges encountered in mapping the brain to study the connections within the brain, its communication network, and patterns that link to human behavior. The connectomics paradigm can in fact be expanded to many other disciplines. For instance, the current approaches to accelerated materials design focus on generating large amounts of data at discrete length and time scales. However, our ability to rapidly translate the knowledge obtained at the atomic level to the systems level is hindered by the difficulties in tracking the connections across time and length scales. 

The connectomics concept can be adapted to create a new paradigm that seeks to discover the key connections between and across length scales, using both computational and experimental methods. Such an approach can meaningfully gather and connect different forms and modalities of data and information, thus, tracing the pathways from quantum level behavior to engineering systems performance. Further, by mapping the comprehensive connections across time and length scales, this connectomics approach will allow us to account for potential human and environmental impact in all phases of the materials’ life cycle, from synthesis through manufacturing, and end-of-life. This would take the field of materials informatics, as applied to materials design and discovery, to a new level. In this symposium, we explore the connectomics paradigm in a highly multidisciplinary perspective including the fields of materials science and engineering, medicine, economics and environmental sciences and policy. 

Group of attendees from previous year's event.

Agenda

Tuesday, June 7 | 110 Knox Hall | North Campus

Time
Topic
Speaker(s)
8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration
 
8:30-9:00 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Krishna Rajan, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Erich Bloch Chair, Department of Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo

Robin Schulze, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences - University at Buffalo
9:00-9:30 a.m. Materials Connectomics
Krishna Rajan, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Erich Bloch Chair, Department of Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
  Session I-A Session Chair: Edward Snell, Director, NSF STC BioXFEL; Senior Scientist, CEO of Hauptman-Woodward Medical Institute; Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
9:30-10:15 a.m. Bridging the Gap: Communicating WIth Data in Multidisciplinary Design and Innovation
Carl Kesselman, William H. Keck Professor of Engineering; Professor, Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering; Fellow, Information Sciences Institute; USC Viterbi School of Engineering and Professor, Preventative Medicine at Keck School of Medicine; Ostrow School of Dentistry - University of Southern California
10:15-11:00 a.m. Connecting the Parts to the Whole: The New Science of Self-organization and Emergent Phenomena
Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Samuel Ruben-Peter G Viele Professor of Engineering, Center of Management of Systemic Risk, Dept. of Chemical Engineering - Columbia University
11:00-11:20 a.m. ----------Break----------
 
  Session I-B Session Chair: Edward Snell, Director, NSF STC BioXFEL; Senior Scientist, CEO of Hauptman-Woodward Medical Institute; Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
11:20-11:40 a.m. Promises and Pitfalls of Autonomous Materials Research
Kristofer Reyes, Assistant Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
11:40-12:00 p.m. Two-Dimensional Post-Graphene Chemistry for Clean Energy Applications
Fei Yao, Assistant Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
12:00-1:00 p.m. ----------Lunch----------  
  Session II-A
Session Chair: Quanxi Jia, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
1:00-1:45 p.m.
Multi-Scale Spatial Biology: A New Horizon in 21st Century Medicine
John Tomaszewski, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Peter A. Nickerson, PhD Professor and Chair of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences - University at Buffalo
1:45-2:30 p.m.
Energy Storage Materials Design with Emerging Classical and Quantum Computing Methods Tammie Borders, Senior Business Development Manager – Quantinuum
2:30-2:50 p.m. ----------Break----------
 
  Session II-B Session Chair: Quanxi Jia, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
2:50-3:10 p.m. Free-Standing Semiconductor Nanomembranes Technology For Wearable Wireless Devices
Jung-Hun Seo, Associate Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
3:10-3:30 p.m. Bridging Gaps with Nanomaterials
Erik Einarsson, Associate Professor, Materials Design and Innovation and Electrical Engineering - University at Buffalo
3:30-4:30 p.m. ARES™ Autonomous Research Systems Control of Carbon Nanotube Yield and Structure
Benji Maruyama, Autonomous Materials Lead-Materials and Manufacturing Directorate - Air Force Research Laboratory
4:30-5:15 p.m. Session II Student Jamboree
Presentations by graduate students from the Department of Materials Design and Innovation
5:30-7:30 p.m. Poster Session and Reception in Davis Hall  

Wednesday, June 8 | 110 Knox Hall | North Campus

Time
Topic
Speaker(s)
8:30-9:15 a.m. Welcome
Kemper Lewis, Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - University at Buffalo
  Session III-A Session Chair: E. Bruce Pitman, Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
9:15-9:45 a.m. From Atoms to the Environment: Data and Materials Science, Hand in Hand Olga Wodo, Associate Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
9:45-10:15 a.m. Designing Alternatives for Environmentally Hazardous Chemicals Prathima Nalan, Assistant Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
10:15-10:45 a.m. ----------Break----------
 
  Session III-B Session Chair: E. Bruce Pitman, Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
10:45-11:30 a.m. Connectomics and Data Justice
Sheila Davis, Executive Director - Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition
11:30-12:15 p.m. Advancing Safer, More Sustainable Chemicals and Materials:  Lessons Learned
Joel Tickner, Director, Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, Professor, Department of Public Health - UMass, Lowell
12:15-1:15 p.m. ----------Lunch----------  
  Session IV-A
Session Chair: Krishna Rajan, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
1:15-2:00 p.m.
Multi-materials Design: Connecting Feasible Regions in Multi-Dimensional Alloy Spaces Raymundo Arróyave, Professor, Department of Materials Science - Texas A&M
  Session IV-B Session Chair: Krishna Rajan, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
2:00-2:30 p.m. Building Connections Between Atom Positions to Material Behavior: A Pathway to Material Design and Development
Baishakhi Mazumdar, Assistant Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
2:30-3:00 p.m. A ‘Connectomics’ Approach for Accelerated High Entropy Alloy Design
Scott Broderick, Assistant Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo
3:00-3:15 p.m. Concluding Comments Krishna Rajan, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Materials Design and Innovation - University at Buffalo 

This is a tentative agenda. Topics, times and speakers are subject to change.

Guest Speakers

Arroyave.

Raymundo Arróyave

Professor, Department of Materials Science - Texas A&M

Tammy.

Tammie Borders

Senior Business Development Manager – Quantinuum

Sheila.

Sheila Davis

Executive Director - Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition

Carl.

Carl Kesselman

William H. Keck Professor of Engineering; Professor, Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering; Fellow, Information Sciences Institute; USC Viterbi School of Engineering and Professor, Preventative Medicine at Keck School of Medicine; Ostrow School of Dentistry - University of Southern California

Benji.

Benji Maruyama

Autonomous Research Lead, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate - Air Force Research Lab

Joel.

Joel Tickner

Director, Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, Professor, Department of Public Health - UMass, Lowell

John.

John Tomaszewski

SUNY Distinguished Professor and Peter A. Nickerson, PhD Professor and Chair of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences - University at Buffalo

Venkat.

Venkat Venkatasubramanian

Samuel Ruben-Peter G Viele Professor of Chemical Engineering - Columbia University

Abstracts

Parking Information

This year's Erich Bloch Symposium will be held in Knox Hall, University at Buffalo, North Campus.

Guests can park in Jarvis Lot, across the street from Davis Hall, off of White Road. Ticketing will be suspended during the Symposium.

Aerial view of Knox Hall on the University at Buffalo's North Campus.

About Erich Bloch

photo of Erich Bloch.

Erich Bloch (January 9, 1925 – November 25, 2016) was a German-born American electrical engineer and administrator. He was involved with developing IBM’s first transistorized supercomputer, 7030 Stretch, and mainframe computer, System/360. He served as director of the National Science Foundation from 1984 to 1990.

Bloch, the son of a Jewish businessman and housewife, lost his parents in the Holocaust, survived the war in a refugee camp in Switzerland and immigrated in 1948 to the United States. He studied electrical engineering at ETH Zurich and received his bachelor of science in electrical engineering from the University of Buffalo.

Bloch joined IBM after graduating in 1952. He was engineering manager of IBM’s STRETCH supercomputer system and director of several research sites during his career. In June 1984, Ronald Reagan nominated Bloch to succeed Edward Alan Knapp as director of the National Science Foundation. The same year, he was elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. In 1985, Bloch was awarded one of the first National Medals of Technology and Innovation along with Bob O. Evans and Fred Brooks for their work on the IBM System/360.

After stepping down as director of the National Science Foundation, Bloch joined the Council on Competitiveness as its first distinguished fellow. The IEEE Computer Society awarded him the Computer Pioneer Award in 1993 for high speed computing. In 2002, the National Science Board honored Bloch with the Vannevar Bush Award. He was made a Fellow of the Computer History Museum in 2004 “for engineering management of the IBM Stretch supercomputer, and of the Solid Logic Technology used in the IBM System/360, which revolutionized the computer industry.”

In 2014, Bloch donated $1.5 million to the University at Buffalo to establish the Erich Bloch Endowed Chair for the new Department of Materials Design and Innovation.