Gang Wu named a Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Analytics

CBE's Gang Wu.

Gang Wu was recognized for his research work in the area of electrocatalysis, a process that is a key component of many emerging energy-related technologies including fuel cells and batteries.

by Nicole Capozziello

Published March 4, 2019

Gang Wu, an associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, was named a 2018 Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Analytics, in recognition of his contribution of multiple highly cited papers that ranked in the top 1% in Web of Science.

"Gang’s recognition as a Highly Cited Researcher demonstrates his impact on the important field of electrocatalysis, and brings valuable recognition to UB and our department."
Mark Swihart, UB Distinguished Professor, Empire Innovation Professor, and chair
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

The highly cited researcher list includes an elite group recognized for exceptional research performance demonstrated by the production of multiple highly cited papers.

“Gang’s recognition as a Highly Cited Researcher demonstrates his impact on the important field of electrocatalysis, and brings valuable recognition to UB and our department,” says Mark Swihart, UB Distinguished Professor, Empire Innovation Professor, and chair of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. “His research provides exceptional opportunities for our students to work at the cutting edge of high-impact scientific research and to develop technologies that are changing the ways that we store and utilize energy.”

Wu is an internationally recognized leader in the field of electrocatalysis, a process that is a key component of many emerging energy-related technologies including fuel cells and batteries. His research focuses on electrochemical energy and environmental applications. He has co-authored more than 200 publications in this area.

Since joining UB in 2014, he has received more than $4 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) and Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), and the National Science Foundation.