Latest News

8/26/19

This summer, five teams of UB students who didn’t know each other from Adam came together in a startup boot camp to develop a medical device to solve a devastating and costly surgical complication. 

8/15/19

The UB School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has been recognized as an Exemplar Bronze Award recipient by the ASEE Diversity Recognition Program. The program publicly recognizes engineering colleges that make significant progress in increasing diversity and inclusion.

8/5/19

University at Buffalo researchers have established a model of the blood clotting process that will help clinicians improve presurgical planning and care for patients with certain bleeding disorders.

7/16/19

The advancement, made possible by tiny photonic implants, could lead to new treatments for cancer, mental disorders.

6/25/19
B. Rita Alevriadou, a renowned scholar in the field of cardiovascular bioengineering, has joined the Department of Biomedical Engineering as a SUNY Empire Innovation Professor.
6/21/19
Anne-Fleur Andrle (MS Biomedical engineering ’13) had a problem: for years, she traveled extensively for her job as a medical applications engineer in medical imaging, finding herself with a well-stamped passport but little to show for it besides jet lag and a thorough reading of her hotel’s room service menu.
6/12/19
An article on MDLinx reports on research by Jonathan Lovell, associate professor of biomedical engineering, that showed that roasted barley performs as well as a convention contrast agent and may aid with photoacoustic computed tomography of the swallowing and gut processes, a finding that could lead to improved diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract and swallowing disorders.
6/4/19
An article in Business First about health insurers who are requiring proof that new treatments work before they will agree to cover them looks at research being conducted at UB to develop a process to make a 3D print model of the human heart and brain to allow surgeons to test new devices, strategies or treatments for individual patients and interviews Ciprian Ionita, professor of biomedical engineering and neurosurgery.