Latest News

3/20/19
Biomedical engineering faculty and students from UB made several significant contributions at this year’s SPIE Medical Imaging Conference. Notably, Alex Podgorsak, a PhD student in biomedical engineering, won a Cum Laude Award for Best Student Poster Presentation.
3/19/19
WBFO-FM reported on Buffalo startup Garwood Medical Devices, which is working with UB’s Buffalo Institute for Genomics and Data Analytics and biomedical researchers to bring to market a medical devices which aims to reduce joint replacement infections through electrical stimulation technology.
3/13/19
An article on SPIE, the website for the International Society for Optics and Photonics, reports on a study noting advancements in 3D-printing patient-specific models to help doctors assess coronary artery disease. Lauren Shepard and Kelsey Sommer, both doctoral students in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, were among the study’s authors.
3/11/19

Buffalo startup Garwood Medical Devices aims to reduce implant failures, prevent suffering and save billions of dollars in medical expenses.

1/18/19
An article on The Doctor’s Channel features a video of Ciprian “Chip” Ionita, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, and Adnan Siddiqui, professor of neurosurgery, about how 3D printing technologies are helping surgeons better prepare for complex procedures.
12/14/18

The models of a patient's vascular system help surgeons better prepare for delicate operations for stroke, aneurysms and heart failure.

11/19/18
An article in The Wire by Wei-Chiao Huang, a PhD candidate in biomedical engineering, and Jonathan Lovell, associate professor of biomedical engineering, describes research that that could boost the efficacy of malarial transmission-blocking vaccines to help reduce the spread of the disease that kills more than 400,000 people annually.
11/13/18
An article in The Conversation by Wei-Chiao Huang, a PhD candidate in biomedical engineering, and Jonathan Lovell, associate professor of biomedical engineering, looks at research that that could boost the efficacy of malarial transmission-blocking vaccines to help reduce the spread of the disease that kills more than 400,000 people annually.