The sun shines on Stevens’ Dimension Fabricators

Scott Stevens cuts the ribbon off a solar panel during a celebration to mark the completion of the installation of a rooftop solar farm at Dimension Fabricators. Shown from left are: Jim Tedisco, Dennis Phayre, Paul Tonko, Stevens, Alicia Barton and Andrew Kennedy.

by Emily Sugarman

Published September 1, 2017

Scott Stevens, an alumnus of UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, is utilizing solar energy for his company, Dimension Fabricators —exemplifying that it is possible to protect the environment and still be a strong, effective business.  

“We produce things that are used to build buildings, bridges, airports, etc.; almost anything involving infrastructure uses what we make. Now, everything we make will come from sun power.”
Scott Stevens (BS' 79, civil engineering), president
Dimension Fabricators

“I’ve been an environmental advocate since junior high school,” Stevens said.

Dimension Fabricators, an acclaimed enterprise that specializes in the fabrication and supply of steel and related materials located in the Glenville Business and Technology Park in Schenectady, New York, finalized the installation of a rooftop solar farm of 3,300 panels in early August.

The 3,300 panels can generate one million watts; this is enough to supply over 90% of Dimension Fabricators energy needs, and is equivalent to powering up to 150 homes. The panels are expected to have a payback period of five years, and will last 20-25 years.

A celebration of the commissioning of the 950KW solar array was held on August 3, 2017. Newly named president and CEO of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), Alicia Barton, U.S. Rep. Paul Tonko, D-Amsterdam, and Andrew Kennedy, president and CEO of the Albany-based Center for Economic Growth (CEG), attended this marking of a new beginning. 

The 1.9 million dollar project, which took just over a year to develop, was part of the CEG SolarGEN campaign, which intends to help well-established manufacturing companies exploit clean energy. The panels were provided by EnterSolar of New York City and funding came from CEG, NYSERDA, federal tax credit, National Grid, and the First National Bank of Scotia.

When asked why he went ahead with the project, Stevens responded, “The reasons are multiple, but primarily, it is just the right thing to do.”

Many similar projects to Dimension Fabricators’ have been underway statewide —all to support Governor Andrew Cuomo’s goal of producing 50 percent of New York State’s energy needs through clean sources by 2030. Cuomo announced that 850 solar projects have been installed or are in maturation in communities through the "Solarize" campaign.

Dimension Fabricators’ commitment to solar power will go beyond its clean electricity and mitigated carbon footprint. “We produce things that are used to build buildings, bridges, airports, etc.; almost anything involving infrastructure uses what we make,” Stevens said. “Now, everything we make will come from sun power.”

Stevens, who is president of the company and a Licensed Professional Engineer, earned his BS in civil and structural engineering from UB in 1979 and is a member of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences’ Dean’s Advisory Council. Among numerous other achievements, Stevens served as chairman of the Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute (CRSI) and is a member of the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Civil Engineers. 

UB is proud to have been a part of this virtuous alumnus’ journey; Stevens inspires engineering students at UB and established engineers alike to practice benevolence through their work.