Russ Agrusa

Founder, President, and CEO, Iconics; Co-Chair, Computer Science and Engineering Industrial Advisory Board

Contact Information

Biography

Russ Agrusa is the Founder, President and CEO of Massachusetts-based ICONICS, (www.iconics.com), a world-leading software developer of open standards-based visualization, HMI / SCADA and enterprise solutions for manufacturing and building automation. With more than 250,000 installations worldwide, ICONICS counts 70 percent of Fortune 1,000 companies as its customers. Organizations such as Audi, Disney, Kuka Robotics, Ford, the Pentagon, American Axle, Poste Italiane, Microsoft and London's Heathrow airport depend on ICONICS products for their mission-critical operations.

He started ICONICS in 1986 to create off-the-shelf HMI and SCADA and Visualization software for factory automation. With over 30 years of experience in the development and management of HMI / SCADA and process control software for a wide variety of industries. Russ started his career at Westinghouse Electric Corporation designing software systems for Fossil and Nuclear Power Plant turbine control systems. He then worked at Foxboro Company leading the HMI development of the "IA" Distributed Control System. After Foxboro, Russ then worked at Analog devices to work on control software for real-time PC based applications.

Agrusa is the recipient of the University of Buffalo School of Engineering and Applied Sciences highest honor, the 2010 Dean's Award for Achievement for substantial contribution to the practice of engineering, applied sciences and for an exceptional professional career. He has served as a member of the University of Buffalo School Engineering Dean's Advisory Council, and Delta Society since 2005 and is a member of the open standards OPC Foundation Board of Directors. Argusa has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo and has taken graduate classes in Computer Science from Boston University.

Education

BS Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, 1976