Clarence Uzoho

Hometown: Rochester, NY

“Always be curious about the usefulness of what you're learning in your courses. Learn how to apply these concepts to real-world engineering tasks, and not just school exams.”
Clarence Uzoho
Mechanical Engineering

Why did you decide to major in MAE?

Because MAE courses equip me with essential knowledge about machine systems, and I need this knowledge to achieve my ambition of creating innovative devices that can solve complications of everyday life.

What is your favorite thing about living in Buffalo?

The food. There are a lot of great places to eat in this city.

What was your involvement outside the classroom?

I was involved in several sporting activities including soccer and basketball events. As far as clubs go, I am a member of the NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) chapter here at UB.

Were you involved in internships and/or undergraduate research?

Yes, I was involved in both undergraduate research and internships. These were great because they exposed me to real-world engineering tasks, and gave me vital hands-on knowledge and skills that I could not have gained solely through my coursework.

What makes your UB story noteworthy?

The fact that I came into this school not knowing anybody and somehow have a diverse group of friends from several cultures all over the world. It has taught me to not be scared to make major transitions in life.

Aside from engineering, what else are you passionate about?

I am passionate about music (mainly hip hop and R&B), soccer, and fashion.

What are your plans after graduation?

I plan to work in the industry as a Mechanical Engineer (for some time) and then go to graduate school for higher learning.

What will you miss most about being a UB undergrad?

I will miss the multitude of free resources (e.g. computer programs) that we are given as undergrads.

What is your advice to current and incoming MAE students?

Always be curious about the usefulness of what you're learning in your courses. Learn how to apply these concepts to real-world engineering tasks, and not just school exams.