Student Profile

Joe DeGolia

BS, Electrical Engineering, 2017

During his NASA internship, Joe DeGolia measured the effects of atmospheric turbulence and other atmospheric factors on the sonic boom wave in the Californian desert.

“STEM is known for being a very white, male-dominated field, which it doesn't necessarily have to be. There are brilliant people in all walks of life and it's beautiful.”
Joe DeGolia, BS Student
Electrical Engineering

Where are you from?
Batavia, N.Y.

What made you choose UB?
I wanted to get a degree in something more technical because I already have a degree in linguistics and UB has a reputable program.

Tell me about your internship at NASA.
I worked in the structural acoustics branch of the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. I performed meta-analysis on previous studies in which aircraft sonic boom noises were simulated, and then I tried to identify the most important metrics for explaining human annoyance to the noise. I also had the opportunity to travel to the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center in California, where my mentor and I went out in the desert and measured the effect of atmospheric turbulence and factors on the sonic boom wave.

What do you like most about UB engineering?
What's nice is the commitment that UB engineering has for raising diversity in the field. 

What's your favorite place on campus?
Davis Hall is a solid place to study. The third floor of Silverman Library is also really nice.

What are you working on right now?
For coursework, I'm working on a report discussing the high voltage applications of implantable medical devices such as pulse generators and pacemakers. I'm also working on a report talking about high performance complex number multiplier implementation through HDL (Hardware Description Language).

What else do you do?
EMERGE, a student-run STEM publication I started, is released once a semester. I'm also a founder of oSTEM@UB, which is a chapter of a national professional organization that aims to empower LGBTQ student leadership in the STEM fields through networking, workshops, mentoring, and other professional events on and off campus. We recently attended our first national conference in Denver, which was really exciting.  

What are you passionate about?
I am passionate about journalism, telling the story objectively and clearly. I am passionate about increasing the awareness of STEM careers among minorities: racial, gender and sexual. STEM is known for being a very white, male-dominated field, which it doesn't necessarily have to be. There are brilliant people in all walks of life and it's beautiful. 

What are your future plans?
The next thing is graduate school. Beyond that I hope to build a career working in a federal research facility or possibly teach.