Graphene-Based Nano-Antennas May Enable Networks of Tiny Machines

Networks of nanometer-scale machines offer exciting potential applications in medicine, industry, environmental protection and defense, but until now there’s been one very small problem: the limited capability of nanoscale antennas fabricated from traditional metallic components.

Assistant Professor Josep Jornet's research with his advisor, Professor Ian Akyildiz on graphene based nano antennas has been featured by the Science andTechnology News Center of Georgia Tech.

The project shows that "the concept of graphene-based nano-antennas is feasible, especially when taking into account very accurate models of electron transport in graphene. Many challenges remain open, but this is a first step toward creating advanced nanomachines with many applications in the biomedical, environmental, industrial and military fields".

The article may be found at:
"Graphene-Based Nano-Antennas May Enable Networks of Tiny Machines"  

Jornet is a member of the Signals, Communications and Networking Research Group in UB’s Department of Electrical Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The group carries out research in: wireless communications and networking, cognitive radios, extreme environment (i.e., underwater, underground) communications, secure communications, data hiding, information theory and coding, adaptive signal processing, compressed sensing,  multimedia systems, magnetic resonance imaging and radar systems.

Other members of the group include professors Stella N. Batalama, Adly T. Fam, Dimitris A. Pados, Mehrdad Soumekh; associate professors Michael Langberg, Tommaso Melodia, Weifeng Su and Leslie Ying; and assistant professors Nicholas Mastronarde, Gesualdo Scutari, Zhi Sun.