Edward Furlani (1952-2018)

PhD

Furlani, Edward

Edward Furlani (1952-2018)

PhD

Edward Furlani (1952-2018)

PhD

Research Topics

Computational Physics/Multidisciplinary Modeling: Nanophotonics; Plasmonics and Metamaterials; Optofluidics; MEMS/MOEMS Simulation; Microfluidics; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Inkjet Systems; Applied Magnetics; Biomagnetics

Contact Information

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Research Overview

Image of Furlani research group members

Furlani research group photo

Research in the Furlani group involved multidisciplinary modeling for emerging applications in the fields of micro and nanoscale science and technology. The main thrust of this work was the development of mathematical methods and models to enable the development of innovative materials and devices with design features and functionality that are engineered at the nanometer to micrometer length scale. Research interests span the areas of: microfluidics, broad applications with an emphasis on biomedical devices; nanophotonics, metamaterials, plasmonics, biosensing applications; and magnetic particle applications, transport, assembly and bioapplications, magnetic drug delivery, magnetic-assisted gene transfection (magnetofection) and bioseparation.

Research Interests

Research Projects

3/22/18
Dr. Furlani's interdisciplinary group of electrical and chemical engineers are helping advance Vader Systems' revolutionary new additive manufacturing process via multiphysics and multiscale computational modelling.
3/22/18
Development of next-gen programmable medical stimulation devices to enable unprecedented treatment for chronic wounds, bone regeneration, and peri-prosthetic (implant) infections, to accelerate healing and increase patient mobility.
1/25/17
Research in Professor Ed Furlani’s laboratory involves multiscale modeling for the development of innovative materials and devices with features that are engineered from the nano to macroscale.
3/22/18
UB CBE Professor Ed Furlani receives $75,000 from FuzeHub, in a partnership with WNY startups CleanSlate UV and Grantwood Technologies
3/22/18
The Furlani research group aims to use applied Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict and simulate the fluid flow of an oil spill from a drilling platform. In the study, FLOW3D is used to study the spread of oil incorporating the key phenomena and factors of the system, and parametric CFD analysis is used to determine the impacts of these factors on the spill dynamics.
3/22/18
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) involves the use of numerical methods and computer modeling to predict and simulate fluid flow, broadly, the motion of gases and liquids. This project aims to combine CFD and experiments to study the effects of turbulent shear stress from bioreactors on the cell culture performance.
3/22/18
Microfluidic and nanofluidic systems enable highly efficient, repeatable and rapid processing of small fluid samples for applications that can involve integrated sequential or multiplexed processes such as chemical reactions, fluid heating, mixing and sensing.
3/22/18
The Furlani research group has recently developed 3D computational models to study the performance of unltrathin composite membranes.
3/22/18
Furlani research group currently uses  CFD to advance fundamental understanding of inkjet processes, determine proof-of-concept, design and optimize system components and generally guide experimental efforts.
3/22/18
Furlani research group developed 3D computational models for the rational design of electronic double layer (EDL) supercapacitors.
3/22/18
Research in the Furlani group involves the use of computational electromagnetic modeling for fundamental understanding of nanophotonic phenomena and for the development of novel nanostructured metamaterials and integrated microdevices for applications broadly in the areas of sensing, imaging and biomedical therapy.
3/22/18
The Furlani research group developed computational models for predicting the assembly of magnetic particles in high-gradient fields and the dynamics of particle-based microstructures. These methods hold potential for the bottom-up fabrication of functional nanostructured materials for broad range of applications.
3/22/18
The Furlani research group developed computational models for predicting field-directed transport and assembly of magnetic particles, dynamics of particle microstructures, and bioapplications of magnetic particles including drug delivery for cancer therapy, microfluidic-based bioseparation and sorting, and magnetic field-assisted gene transfection (magnetofection).
3/22/18
Furlani research group aims to use computational modeling for the rational design of magnetic materials, structures and related devices

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